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thisperspective:

jamaicanamazon:

kathereal:

brownglucose:

poeticallyflowing:

lilaceverglades:

-teesa-:

10.6.14

stoppppppp this he just shed light on so many issues in a sentence

💀💀💀💀💀

Jesus

*Mops the tea up from my dashboard*

Wow.

…AAAAANNNNNND *THAT* is how you do SATIRE.


thelastgleekbender:

thepanduchessofshade:

niggas-in-hijaz:

inkedinwhite:

superbestiario:

Shia Labeouf for interview magazine november 2014

By ELVIS MITCHELL

Photography CRAIG MCDEAN

Oh my god.

黑人在希賈茲

Shia has reached hottie dad status. How is that possible?


"Never, ever confuse what happens on a runway with fashion. A runway is spectacle. It’s only fashion when a woman puts it on. Being well dressed hasn’t much to do with having good clothes. It’s a question of good balance and good common sense."

Oscar de la Renta *Dressed (via glamour)


honestly-wtf:

Flowers Not Guns | HonestlyWTF






"Sometimes you can’t explain what you see in a person. It’s just the way they take you to a place where no one else can."

Unknown (via mourningmelody)


"We praise people for being “naturally” smart, too, “naturally” athletic, and etc. But studies continue to show, as they have for some time now, that it is generally healthier to praise schoolchildren for being hardworking, than for being naturally gifted. We know now that to emphasize a child’s inherent ability places pressure on that child to continue to be accidentally talented, which is something that is hard for anyone to control. When the children who are applauded for their natural skills fail, they are shown to take the failure very personally. After all, the process of their success has always seemed mysterious and basic and inseparable from the rest of their identity, so it must be they who are failing as whole people. When students are instead complimented and rewarded for their effort and improvement, they tend to not be so hard on themselves. When they fail, they reason, “Well, I’ll work harder next time.” They learn that they are capable of success, rather than constantly automatically deserving of it, and they learn simultaneously that they are bigger and more complex than their individual successes or failures."

Kate of Eat the Damn Cake, The Stupidity of “Natural” Beauty (via capefear)



Doing what I do






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